Follow @DandridgeLove Tweet
Adoringly Dorothy Dandridge
“I ceased to have the motivations for ‘staying’ that dominate many or most actors and actresses after they have arrived.”-Dorothy Dandridge

“I ceased to have the motivations for ‘staying’ that dominate many or most actors and actresses after they have arrived.”-Dorothy Dandridge

“Whenever the phone rang in the tiny carton-cluttered office, Dorothy [Dandridge] picked up the receiver and said—in a grand theatrical manner—“Hello. Yes, this is Miss Dandridge.” If the caller on the other end was a friend, her tone and language immediately changed. “Hi, honey. How are you!” I would just laugh after that. She was just adorable. She was just as cute as she could be. Really a very sweet girl. I just loved her.”-William Roy

“Whenever the phone rang in the tiny carton-cluttered office, Dorothy [Dandridge] picked up the receiver and said—in a grand theatrical manner—“Hello. Yes, this is Miss Dandridge.” If the caller on the other end was a friend, her tone and language immediately changed. “Hi, honey. How are you!” I would just laugh after that. She was just adorable. She was just as cute as she could be. Really a very sweet girl. I just loved her.”-William Roy

“She [Dorothy Dandridge] always was a very gentle, highly refined young lady. Soft spoken. No hard edges to her.”-Orin Borsten

“She [Dorothy Dandridge] always was a very gentle, highly refined young lady. Soft spoken. No hard edges to her.”-Orin Borsten

“From my early teens I had wanted a romance to be just a simple idealistic thing, but instead it was always a game of fox and hounds, with me as the fox, of course.”-Dorothy Dandridge

“From my early teens I had wanted a romance to be just a simple idealistic thing, but instead it was always a game of fox and hounds, with me as the fox, of course.”-Dorothy Dandridge

Dorothy Dandridge speaking with director Laslo Benedek on the set of Malaga (1960) while co-star Trevor Howard listens in. Photo via acertaincinema.com

Dorothy Dandridge speaking with director Laslo Benedek on the set of Malaga (1960) while co-star Trevor Howard listens in. Photo via acertaincinema.com

In the film Malaga, much like with Island in the Sun, Dorothy Dandridge’s character was not clearly identified by either race or nationality. The film’s producer Thomas Clyde wanted to approach the story “without any connection to color, any reference to the fact that she was a Colored girl.” He believed that in Malaga, Dorothy would prove herself “as a fine performer—and not as a symbol of her race.” The film’s director Laslo Benedek said, “ I thought this was a daring breakthrough to pair a Colored actress with Trevor Howard. And we all agreed, `Well, let’s try it.’” Dorothy told her manager Earl Mills of her character Gianna, “I don’t understand this girl.” She bemoaned, “What’s she about? Where does she come from emotionally?” What bothered Dorothy the most was the fact that while the scriptwriters believed that they were being quite daring by letting a Black actress play a non-racial role, they however were not courageous enough to transcend traditional racial codes. “No one knew what her nationality was to be in the picture. The problem as to whether Trevor Howard should kiss her on the screen was called ridiculous. This was Dorothy’s most frustrating acting experience by far,” said Earl Mills.

In the film Malaga, much like with Island in the Sun, Dorothy Dandridge’s character was not clearly identified by either race or nationality. The film’s producer Thomas Clyde wanted to approach the story “without any connection to color, any reference to the fact that she was a Colored girl.” He believed that in Malaga, Dorothy would prove herself “as a fine performer—and not as a symbol of her race.” The film’s director Laslo Benedek said, “ I thought this was a daring breakthrough to pair a Colored actress with Trevor Howard. And we all agreed, `Well, let’s try it.’” Dorothy told her manager Earl Mills of her character Gianna, “I don’t understand this girl.” She bemoaned, “What’s she about? Where does she come from emotionally?” What bothered Dorothy the most was the fact that while the scriptwriters believed that they were being quite daring by letting a Black actress play a non-racial role, they however were not courageous enough to transcend traditional racial codes. “No one knew what her nationality was to be in the picture. The problem as to whether Trevor Howard should kiss her on the screen was called ridiculous. This was Dorothy’s most frustrating acting experience by far,” said Earl Mills.

Dorothy Dandridge with her attorney, Robert S. Butts, outside a Los Angeles Superior courtroom where she was granted a divorce from Jack Denison on December 18, 1962. Butts also handled her divorce from her first husband, Harold Nicholas. Dorothy sought the divorce from Jack on the grounds of   “extreme cruelty,” and she charged that he wrongfully “inflicted upon her grievous mental suffering.” She called for a restraining order to keep Jack away from her, stating that he had struck her on numerous occasions, and she requested that he be removed from her home. Jack told the press that he would not fight the divorce, ever the con artist he made it seem as though he was the ideal husband and simply the victim of circumstances and financial issues. Dorothy testified in court before Judge Burnett Wolfson saying, “He has a temper and he wanted to be a part of everything. He would shout and throw things and told me if I didn’t listen to him, I would never be successful.” She then added touchingly, “And I do have to be successful.” She went on to explain how this effected he career saying, “ I haven’t worked very much because of this hassle going on, but now with the divorce, I think I can get my career together, which I couldn’t have done previously.” Dorothy’s secretary Veada Cleveland, testified as a corroborating witness in her defense. Jack never appeared to answer the complaints against him. Dorothy’s second marriage lasted three years, four months, and one day.

Dorothy Dandridge with her attorney, Robert S. Butts, outside a Los Angeles Superior courtroom where she was granted a divorce from Jack Denison on December 18, 1962. Butts also handled her divorce from her first husband, Harold Nicholas. Dorothy sought the divorce from Jack on the grounds of “extreme cruelty,” and she charged that he wrongfully “inflicted upon her grievous mental suffering.” She called for a restraining order to keep Jack away from her, stating that he had struck her on numerous occasions, and she requested that he be removed from her home. Jack told the press that he would not fight the divorce, ever the con artist he made it seem as though he was the ideal husband and simply the victim of circumstances and financial issues. Dorothy testified in court before Judge Burnett Wolfson saying, “He has a temper and he wanted to be a part of everything. He would shout and throw things and told me if I didn’t listen to him, I would never be successful.” She then added touchingly, “And I do have to be successful.” She went on to explain how this effected he career saying, “ I haven’t worked very much because of this hassle going on, but now with the divorce, I think I can get my career together, which I couldn’t have done previously.” Dorothy’s secretary Veada Cleveland, testified as a corroborating witness in her defense. Jack never appeared to answer the complaints against him. Dorothy’s second marriage lasted three years, four months, and one day.

Dorothy Dandridge at the Heathrow Airport in London, on December 9, 1956. She was in London to film interior scenes for Island in the Sun.

Dorothy Dandridge at the Heathrow Airport in London, on December 9, 1956. She was in London to film interior scenes for Island in the Sun.

dandridgelove:

ONLY one day Left, to preorder this beautiful “Starlet” Tee! Don’t miss out. Make sure you follow the link below to get 15% off!

@419pressnation @419online are NOW taking Pre-orders for this beautiful Dorothy Dandridge “Starlet” Tee! There is limited availability, so make sure you pre-order NOW at www.419PRESSNATION.com ! You can look as lovely as @dlove96 in your very own “Starlet” tee, by pre-ordering right NOW! They won’t be available long so don’t wait!Use the Coupon code: DANDRIDGELOVE for 15% off! 

Here is the link http://www.419pressnation.com/?coupon=DANDRIDGELOVE

dandridgelove:

ONLY one day Left, to preorder this beautiful “Starlet” Tee! Don’t miss out. Make sure you follow the link below to get 15% off!

@419pressnation @419online are NOW taking Pre-orders for this beautiful Dorothy Dandridge “Starlet” Tee! There is limited availability, so make sure you pre-order NOW at www.419PRESSNATION.com ! You can look as lovely as @dlove96 in your very own “Starlet” tee, by pre-ordering right NOW! They won’t be available long so don’t wait!Use the Coupon code: DANDRIDGELOVE for 15% off! Here is the link http://www.419pressnation.com/?coupon=DANDRIDGELOVE

dandridgelove:
 
This beauty is apart of the End of Summer Sale! Visit Kingjamesexclusives.bigcartel.com for more info!
“Dorothy Dandridge”,crop top by @exclusive_james on Instagram is now available for purchase in sizes S-XL! This shirt has white leather sleeves and print on the front and back. To purchase this beauty visit, Kingjamesexclusives.bigcartel.com

dandridgelove:

This beauty is apart of the End of Summer Sale! Visit Kingjamesexclusives.bigcartel.com for more info!

“Dorothy Dandridge”,crop top by @exclusive_james on Instagram is now available for purchase in sizes S-XL! This shirt has white leather sleeves and print on the front and back. To purchase this beauty visit, Kingjamesexclusives.bigcartel.com

Dorothy Dandridge gracing the cover of Der Stern’s October 30, 1955 issue.

Dorothy Dandridge gracing the cover of Der Stern’s October 30, 1955 issue.

Dorothy Dandridge captured beautifully by photographer Wallace Seawell at his studio in West Hollywood, California in 1964.

Dorothy Dandridge captured beautifully by photographer Wallace Seawell at his studio in West Hollywood, California in 1964.

Dorothy Dandridge arriving with her second husband, Jack Denison at Idlewild Airport in New York on June 23, 1959, a day after their wedding in Los Angeles. They arrived via an American Airlines 707 jet flagship. The two were in town for the premiere of Dorothy’s film Porgy and Bess.

Dorothy Dandridge arriving with her second husband, Jack Denison at Idlewild Airport in New York on June 23, 1959, a day after their wedding in Los Angeles. They arrived via an American Airlines 707 jet flagship. The two were in town for the premiere of Dorothy’s film Porgy and Bess.

Dorothy Dandridge as Miss Jane Richards from the film Bright Road (1953). Photo via warnerarchive

Dorothy Dandridge as Miss Jane Richards from the film Bright Road (1953). Photo via warnerarchive

On Dorothy Dandridge’s skin color, her best friend Geri said, “It was pure café au lait”, and “absolutely gorgeous.” She also said, “There is nobody that I’ve ever seen who had that coloring.”

On Dorothy Dandridge’s skin color, her best friend Geri said, “It was pure café au lait”, and “absolutely gorgeous.” She also said, “There is nobody that I’ve ever seen who had that coloring.”