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Dorothy Dandridge with her ex-husband Harold Nicholas at an airport in Copenhagen. Her film Carmen Jones was then playing, and Fox hoped that while there she would meet with the Danish press and do some promotional work for it. Harold was also appearing in the city and was contacted by the publicity people at Fox. Harold said, “The press knew she was coming in. The reporters called me and asked if I would go to the airport because they wanted to take some pictures.” He agreed, as the publicity could be good for both. Dorothy received a stars welcome upon her arrival, as she descended down the stairs of the plane she was greeted by photographers and reporters. “She looked more glamourous. She had a glamorous thing going then. Before she was just a young girl. Now she was a glamorous woman. I was just so happy because the whole world then was talking about her, so to speak. But at this time, it was a little different from the past. I could see that she was on the star side. She was posing and turning her head up and this way and that. I didn’t blame her ‘cause that was it. She had to play the role,” said Nicholas. Dorothy hadn’t seen Harold in several years and seeing him now, she knew this could be a vindication of sorts; a true validation that all those years ago she really had had talent. Yet she was genuinely eager to see him. The two chatted as the photographers snapped their pictures. “It was just about an hour or so,” said Nicholas. After their meeting he watched Dorothy as she boarded a plane back to the States.

Dorothy Dandridge with her ex-husband Harold Nicholas at an airport in Copenhagen. Her film Carmen Jones was then playing, and Fox hoped that while there she would meet with the Danish press and do some promotional work for it. Harold was also appearing in the city and was contacted by the publicity people at Fox. Harold said, “The press knew she was coming in. The reporters called me and asked if I would go to the airport because they wanted to take some pictures.” He agreed, as the publicity could be good for both. Dorothy received a stars welcome upon her arrival, as she descended down the stairs of the plane she was greeted by photographers and reporters. “She looked more glamourous. She had a glamorous thing going then. Before she was just a young girl. Now she was a glamorous woman. I was just so happy because the whole world then was talking about her, so to speak. But at this time, it was a little different from the past. I could see that she was on the star side. She was posing and turning her head up and this way and that. I didn’t blame her ‘cause that was it. She had to play the role,” said Nicholas. Dorothy hadn’t seen Harold in several years and seeing him now, she knew this could be a vindication of sorts; a true validation that all those years ago she really had had talent. Yet she was genuinely eager to see him. The two chatted as the photographers snapped their pictures. “It was just about an hour or so,” said Nicholas. After their meeting he watched Dorothy as she boarded a plane back to the States.

“At [the] pinnacle of her career, Miss [Dorothy] Dandridge was the consummate image of a sleek, Hollywood-groomed sex goddess.”-Jet magazine

“At [the] pinnacle of her career, Miss [Dorothy] Dandridge was the consummate image of a sleek, Hollywood-groomed sex goddess.”-Jet magazine

“Like all great stars, she [Dorothy Dandridge] was an aesthetic being unto herself; part real, part myth, touching on a collective vision and experience. Yet each viewer could connect with her in the most personal way and project onto Dandridge his or her own personal hopes, fears, fantasies. In Carmen Jones, she was the personification of the in-your-face live wire beauty: bold, brash, independent, sure of herself. As Bess, she was a doomed spirit, slowly moving to the inevitable end. Again, the viewer might not believe in the movie. But one always believed in her.”-Donald Bogle

“Like all great stars, she [Dorothy Dandridge] was an aesthetic being unto herself; part real, part myth, touching on a collective vision and experience. Yet each viewer could connect with her in the most personal way and project onto Dandridge his or her own personal hopes, fears, fantasies. In Carmen Jones, she was the personification of the in-your-face live wire beauty: bold, brash, independent, sure of herself. As Bess, she was a doomed spirit, slowly moving to the inevitable end. Again, the viewer might not believe in the movie. But one always believed in her.”-Donald Bogle

Many thanks to 419pressnation for this beautiful Dorothy Dandridge “Starlet” V-neck tee!! I absolutely love it, and can’t wait to wear it! To get one of your very own please visit 
www.419pressnation.com ! They have just added new garment options to there online store! Don’t miss the chance to get this beauty.💚💛

Many thanks to 419pressnation for this beautiful Dorothy Dandridge “Starlet” V-neck tee!! I absolutely love it, and can’t wait to wear it! To get one of your very own please visit
www.419pressnation.com ! They have just added new garment options to there online store! Don’t miss the chance to get this beauty.💚💛

The world lost a trailblazing icon, Ms. Dorothy Jean Dandridge, 49 years ago today. Though she is gone, she is never forgotten and is always present in our hearts and minds. We remember her for her fearless courage, incomparable talents, and magnificent beauty. Rest in beautiful peace, Dottie.❤️

The world lost a trailblazing icon, Ms. Dorothy Jean Dandridge, 49 years ago today. Though she is gone, she is never forgotten and is always present in our hearts and minds. We remember her for her fearless courage, incomparable talents, and magnificent beauty. Rest in beautiful peace, Dottie.❤️

“She [Dorothy Dandridge] was outstandingly beautiful, and sometimes I think that can be very difficult for a woman. In this town, you can get chewed up… but she never knuckled under one time. They never had to take up a collection for her. She fought it through. I think she died of exhasution—and a broken heart.”-Geri Branton (Dorothy’s best friend)

Rest in Beautiful Peace, Dorothy. (November 9, 1922-September 8, 1965)

“She [Dorothy Dandridge] was outstandingly beautiful, and sometimes I think that can be very difficult for a woman. In this town, you can get chewed up… but she never knuckled under one time. They never had to take up a collection for her. She fought it through. I think she died of exhasution—and a broken heart.”-Geri Branton (Dorothy’s best friend)

Rest in Beautiful Peace, Dorothy. (November 9, 1922-September 8, 1965)

“As a humanitarian, she [Dorothy Dandridge] was a wonderful, wonderful, kind human being. She always had a smile. She was very thoughtful and considerate with the players and especially myself. It was wonderful to work with her, and I thought she was a wonderful perfromer. She was quiet and undemanding. People can be such dogs. Dorothy was just the opposite.”-Marty Paich

“As a humanitarian, she [Dorothy Dandridge] was a wonderful, wonderful, kind human being. She always had a smile. She was very thoughtful and considerate with the players and especially myself. It was wonderful to work with her, and I thought she was a wonderful perfromer. She was quiet and undemanding. People can be such dogs. Dorothy was just the opposite.”-Marty Paich

The AG Bombshell Original The “The Dandridge III” Flowy Vneck Tank inspired by the one and only Ms. Dorothy Dandridge is NOW available by mygeniuslife ! Get 15% with the promocode: ag2p. There is also free shipping on ALL orders! Get yours today at www.accidentalgeniusclothing.com!

The AG Bombshell Original The “The Dandridge III” Flowy Vneck Tank inspired by the one and only Ms. Dorothy Dandridge is NOW available by mygeniuslife ! Get 15% with the promocode: ag2p. There is also free shipping on ALL orders! Get yours today at www.accidentalgeniusclothing.com!

“My overall impression of Dorothy [Dandridge] is as a very sweet, naive, gentle person, who always wanted to please and be liked. And I’m never too sure whether her ambition stemmed from her own inner desire or whether  it was because of her mother and her distant aunt that she was living with.”-Dorothy Nicholas Morrow

“My overall impression of Dorothy [Dandridge] is as a very sweet, naive, gentle person, who always wanted to please and be liked. And I’m never too sure whether her ambition stemmed from her own inner desire or whether it was because of her mother and her distant aunt that she was living with.”-Dorothy Nicholas Morrow

Dorothy Dandridge sings, “Get the Light Idea”, in her JAX BEER advertisement.

Dorothy Dandridge sings, “Get the Light Idea”, in her JAX BEER advertisement.

Porgy and Bess was Dorothy Dandridge’s last major film and for the role of Bess producer Samuel Goldwyn considered no one else. With Dorothy paired with Sidney Poitier as the leads, Goldwyn believed they would bring the story to film as he envisioned it. The decision to play Bess was not an easy one for Dorothy. She believed that within the story of Porgy and Bess some basic truths were told about “the harsh, terrorized lives of Negroes forced to live in ghettoes.”  She also felt to show true authenticity that, “Actually, the film should have been shot in the streets, in the shack-ridden quarters that fester throughout the South.” Fellow actor Harry Belafonte, who was initially considered for the role of Porgy called and role her, “Don’t do it, it isn’t right. I’m out of it.” Diahann Carroll who played Clara said, “I didn’t want to do it, because the racial stereotypes of Catfish Row held absolutely no attraction for me, and I was offended by the story.” Sidney Poitier rejected the offer to play Porgy also, but in the end, Samuel Goldwyn’s pull in Hollywood proved to be powerful as his role in The Defiant Ones was at risk if he didn’t honor the agreement to play Porgy made by his West Coast agent. He later said, “In my judgement Porgy and Bess was not material complimentary to Black people.” Dorothy told Sidney Poitier this of her decision to play Bess, “Look I have spoken with Mr. Goldwyn about this. He’s going to do this picture with or without me. He will do it with or without you. Now the way I’m thinking, if I can help to bring some dignity to the role, maybe that is what it needs.”

Porgy and Bess was Dorothy Dandridge’s last major film and for the role of Bess producer Samuel Goldwyn considered no one else. With Dorothy paired with Sidney Poitier as the leads, Goldwyn believed they would bring the story to film as he envisioned it. The decision to play Bess was not an easy one for Dorothy. She believed that within the story of Porgy and Bess some basic truths were told about “the harsh, terrorized lives of Negroes forced to live in ghettoes.” She also felt to show true authenticity that, “Actually, the film should have been shot in the streets, in the shack-ridden quarters that fester throughout the South.” Fellow actor Harry Belafonte, who was initially considered for the role of Porgy called and role her, “Don’t do it, it isn’t right. I’m out of it.” Diahann Carroll who played Clara said, “I didn’t want to do it, because the racial stereotypes of Catfish Row held absolutely no attraction for me, and I was offended by the story.” Sidney Poitier rejected the offer to play Porgy also, but in the end, Samuel Goldwyn’s pull in Hollywood proved to be powerful as his role in The Defiant Ones was at risk if he didn’t honor the agreement to play Porgy made by his West Coast agent. He later said, “In my judgement Porgy and Bess was not material complimentary to Black people.” Dorothy told Sidney Poitier this of her decision to play Bess, “Look I have spoken with Mr. Goldwyn about this. He’s going to do this picture with or without me. He will do it with or without you. Now the way I’m thinking, if I can help to bring some dignity to the role, maybe that is what it needs.”

“In an age that celebrated Marilyn and Liz and Grace and Audrey, Dorothy Dandridge had brought the Black actress in films from behind the shadows and had emerged as Hollywood’s first authentic movie goddess of color. She had reconfigured the very definition of what a movie star was supposed to be.”-Donald Bogle

“In an age that celebrated Marilyn and Liz and Grace and Audrey, Dorothy Dandridge had brought the Black actress in films from behind the shadows and had emerged as Hollywood’s first authentic movie goddess of color. She had reconfigured the very definition of what a movie star was supposed to be.”-Donald Bogle

Dorothy Dandridge with her childhood friend, Dorothy Hughes McConnell, and her husband, Woodrow. They attended one of Dorothy’s performances at the Alhambra Tavern in her hometown of Cleveland, Ohio, during her two-week engagement there. After Dorothy’s performance they visited her in her dressing room. Also while in Cleveland, McConnell’s mother and friend to the family Genevieve Hughes, invited Dorothy over to her home for a luncheon with a few close friends and family. Dorothy asked Ms.Hughes to fix chitlins, corn muffins, greens, and coleslaw. The menu included two of Dorothy’s favorite dishes greens and chitlins. The article above was featured in Jet magazine’s June 19, 1952 issue courtesy of vieilles-annonces .

“[Dorothy] Dandridge’s image signaled that Black American women, rather than being exotics, were intelligent, elegant, sophisticated, and worldly. It was this aspect of Dandridge that made her so appealing and important to Black America. Had the movie industry provided her with choice, sophisticated roles, the perceptions of Black women in the consciousness of the American mass audience might have changed all the more dramatically.”-Donald Bogle

“[Dorothy] Dandridge’s image signaled that Black American women, rather than being exotics, were intelligent, elegant, sophisticated, and worldly. It was this aspect of Dandridge that made her so appealing and important to Black America. Had the movie industry provided her with choice, sophisticated roles, the perceptions of Black women in the consciousness of the American mass audience might have changed all the more dramatically.”-Donald Bogle